Traveling Time (R)

January 25, 2015

Are you planning a winter getaway? Are you headed to a quiet beach, or somewhere more adventurous? In this hour, we talk with writers, philosophers and veteran itinerants about hitting the road. Plus, a look at New York's High Line, more than five years into its reinvention.

  1. Old Roads to Rome

    Travel writer Tony Perrotet has spent his career traveling all over the globe, but he skipped the Mediterranean tour, choosing Tierra del Fuego or the Amazon over Rome. But the discovery of an ancient guide book launched him on his most exotic journey yet, in the footsteps of the Ancients.

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  2. Sonic Sidebar: Aboard Niagara

    Some of the greatest trips give us that feeling of traveling back in time. Last summer, Aubrey Ralph did nearly that, when he spent nine days sailing aboard a 200 year old tall ship, across two Great Lakes. He was with the reconstructed U.S. Brig Niagara as she shoved off from her home port in Erie, PA.

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  3. The Road to Tantra - Asra Nomani

    When Asra Normani got an assignment to research Tantra - an ancient form of yoga - she thought she'd have an adventure. She ended up on a journey of the spirit and the heart.

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  4. The Art of Travel - Alain de Botton

    Why do we have such an appetite for adventure? And why do many artists seem to spend so much time on the road? Those questions inspired philosopher Alain de Botton's book called "The Art of Travel."

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  5. BookMark: Karen Russell on "A High Wind in Jamaica"

    Karen Russell bookmarks "A High Wind in Jamaica," by Richard Hughes.

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  6. On Our Minds: The New High Line

    Have you been to the High Line yet? It’s one of Manhattan's newest parks. In the summer, it's full of sunbathers, lush plantings and strolling locals. It’s also about 30 feet above the ground, built on the bed of an old elevated train line. Writer Annik LaFarge talks about the park, five years into its reinvention.

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