Seeing Stars

October 14, 2001

What do Oprah Winfrey, Tom Cruise and Madonna have in common?  Not much, except the kind of blazing fame that turns relatively normal people into obsessive fans who would walk ten miles through a blizzard just to stand in celebrity garbage.  In this hour of To the Best of Our Knowledge, the culture of fame.  From one writer who sees celebrity as a grotesque, crippling disease, to actor Bruce Campbell on B-movies.

  1. Cintra Wilson on Critique of Fame

    Cultural critic Cintra Wilson thinks American’s fascination with fame is a grotesque, crippling disease.  She tears into it in her book “A Massive Swelling.”

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  2. Jim Elledge on Pop Culture Poetry

    Jim Elledge is the co-editor (with Susan Swartwout) of “Real Things,” an anthology of poetry that references popular culture.

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  3. Bruce Campbell on Being a B Movie Actor

    Bruce Campbell, (to his chagrin) still best known as “Ash” from “The Evil Dead” movies, talks with Jim Fleming about his memoir, “If Chins Could Kill: Confessions of a B Movie Actor.”

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  4. Tyler Cowen on Benefits of Fame

    Tyler Cowen tells Jim Fleming he has no problem with movie stars recommending political candidates, and that many celebrities use their clout to support charities or advance social causes.

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  5. Paul Collins on Forgotten Celebs

    Paul Collins researched forgotten stars for his book “Banvard’s Folly: Thirteen Tales of Renowned Obscurity, Famous Anonymity and Rotten Luck.”

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