Remembering Neurologist and Author Oliver Sacks

Renowned neurologist and author Oliver Sacks passed away on Sunday in Manhattan. He was 82. In February, Sacks announced that he had terminal cancer in the New York Times. Since then, he's written several additional articles reflecting on his life.

Dr. Sacks was as gifted a storyteller as he was a scientist. His books on his patients and their rare neurological conditions were not only popular in their own right, but also adapted into movies and stage plays. Perhaps the most famous of these is “Awakenings,” the 1990 Robin Williams film based on Sacks’ 1973 book of the same name.

Sacks appeared five times on To the Best of Our Knowledge between 2002 and 2013, with his trademark blend of wit, insight, and storytelling. Below, we've collected those conversations:

Oliver Sacks on Music Therapy

Oliver Sacks talks with Jim Fleming about the awesome power of music to enrich lives of patients with Parkinson’s Disease and other neurological disorders.

0
Your rating: None
0
No votes yet

Oliver Sacks on "Uncle Tungsten"

In one of his most personal books, Sacks recalls his childhood in wartime London and the important role chemistry played in his life. He explains how he was comforted by the rigor and orderliness of science.

0
Your rating: None
0
No votes yet

Oliver Sacks on "Musicophilia: Tales of Music and the Brain."

No matter how much we learn about the brain, Sacks says we may never understand how the mind works. In this interview, he marvels at how the human brain is fine-tuned to respond to music.

0
Your rating: None
3.333335
Average: 3.3 (3 votes)

Oliver Sacks on Facial Blindness

Sacks had a particular fascination with the ways our brains can play tricks on our vision. He also reveals his own lifelong struggle to recognize the faces of other people.

0
Your rating: None
4.88889
Average: 4.9 (9 votes)

Oliver Sacks on "Hallucinations"

In his last few years, Sacks revealed more details about his own life. One of the most remarkable revelations was his extensive use of LSD and other hallucinogens in the ‘60s. He tells Steve Paulson that psychedelics nearly killed him, but they also opened his mind to new ways of seeing the world.

0
Your rating: None
4.8
Average: 4.8 (5 votes)