Reinventing Fiction (Repeat)

March 27, 2016
(was 08.16.2015)

Are you tired of the old way of fiction? Are Japanese cell phone novels just not doing it for you any more? Fear not. Today, we meet writers who are blowing up the novel by inventing new forms of fiction.

  1. Blurring The Lines Between Fiction And Reality

    Canadian novelist Sheila Heti talks about her new novel, "How Should a Person Be?" It's fiction, but the characters are real people -- they seem to be Sheila herself and her friends.  Some of the dialogue is from actual conversations she transcribed.  So what is this thing?

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  2. Karl Ove Knausgaard on Remembering and Recreating Memories

    Novelists have always mined their own lives for inspiration. But no ever's gone quite as far as Karl Ove Knausgaard.  People call him the Norwegian Proust.  He recently came out with the sixth volume of his autobiographical novel, "My Struggle." What's remarkable about Knausgaard is not just that he's telling the story of his life as a novel.  It's the incredible level of detail.

     

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  3. BookMark: "Mes Amis"

    Sarah Manguso recommends "Mes Amis" by Emmanuel Bove.

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  4. A Novel in 27 Volumes

    Mark Z. Danielewski has a reputation for pushing the envelope when it comes to writing novels. His debut novel, "House of Leaves," is full of multiple layers, strange typography, and footnotes within footnotes. And his new novel, "The Familiar," will consist of 27 volumes, two or three which will be published every year. Danielewski compares "The Familiar" to a TV series.

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  5. Long-Lost Country Music Album Finally Released After 40 Years

    On our minds this week is the story of a long-lost country music album that's just been released 40 years after it was recorded.  Country musicians Vince Matthews and Jim Casey recorded "The Kingston Springs Suite" back in the early '70s.  It was backed by some big names. At the time, Matthews and Casey were rising stars in Nashville. But after their record deal tanked, Matthews' career faded away.  He died in 2003 but Jim Casey is still around to talk about the album.

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