Regarding the Pain of Others (update)

September 27, 2015

There are images that once seen, can't be forgotten.  Like the recent photograph of a Syrian toddler who drowned when his family tried to flee their country. With his dark hair and bright red t-shirt and shorts, he has become the symbol of refugees fleeing Syria to Europe.  This hour, the morality and ethics of photographing war and human crisis. Do images of pain and suffering foster empathy and compassion?  Or something more complicated?

 

  1. Regarding the Pain of Others - Susan Sontag

    Graphic war photos can be very powerful, but they often elicit complicated and unforeseen reactions among viewers.

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  2. At the Hour of Our Death - Sarah Sudhoff

    Photographer Sarah Sudhoff has made art out of death.

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  3. Sonic Sidebar: William Christenberry

    William Christenberry never intended to cross the path of the pain of others with his photos. He takes photos of simple buildings, mostly in Hale County, Alabama.

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  4. Potraits of the Mentally Ill - Michael Nye

    Photographer Michael Nye made portraits of the mentally ill and homeless people in San Antonio, where he lives. He also recorded their stories.

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  5. The Rwanda Project - Art from War

    Chilean-born artist Alfredo Jaar has spent much of his career regarding the pain of others. He delves into issues like war or globalization with giant installations and photos. But his work does not take use a grand scale, instead, he drills down to one individual. His most famous work is 6-year project on the Rwandan Genocide called “The Rwanda Project.”

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