Re-Thinking Education

May 12, 2013
(was 06.03.2012)

While the debate about how to fix America’s schools rages on, millions of parents have their own solution – opting out of the system.  Homeschoolers in America usually make the choice for two reasons – to invest more religion in the curriculum or to embrace the vales of progressive education.  This hour, we’ll hear the argument for unschooling – letting the child dictate the learning outside of school, and the argument against it. We’re re-thinking education, from college programs for the incarcerated to a call for the end of standardized tests.

  1. Alfie Kohn on Progressive Education

    You want kids to love learning?  Get rid of the emphais on grades and test scores.  That's according to Alfie Kohn, one of America's most passionate advocates for progressive education.

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  2. Astra Taylor and Dana Goldstein on the Schooling Debate

    Do public schools stifle creativity and real learning, or are they essential to a diverse society? Questions like this have sparked a lively debate in response to Astra Taylor’s recent essay “Unschooling” in the literary magazine n+1 and Dana Goldstein’s response in Slate. We hear both sides.

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  3. Jody Lewen on the Prison University Project

    Jody Lewen is the executive director of the Prison University Project, a degree-granting program for the inmates at San Quentin State Prison in California.  She's seen first hand the transformative power of knowledge and education and thinks the most important feature of higher education should be accessibility.

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  4. Sean Pica on Earning His Degree in Prison

    Sean Pica is the executive director of Hudson Link for Higher Education in Prison, a degree granting program out of Sing-Sing Prison in New York State.  It's full-circle for Pica who was convicted and served time for a crime he committed as a teenager. 

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