Race and Fear (Special)

Image: Louish Pixel Via: Flickr Creative Commons

Flickr: Louish Pixel

February 1, 2015

In the wake of a number of high profile shootings over the past year, people are talking about policing, racism, and injustice. But there's one issue we don't really talk all that much about: fear.This hour, we take a closer look at negative stereotypes about African American men, how those biases affect our justice system, and what we might be able to do about it.

  1. Overcoming Racism

    What happens when you discover racial fear in yourself? Rachel Shadoan recently reached an uncomfortable conclusion: she was afraid of black men. Rachel was appalled and decided to do something about it. She tells her story in an article titled, "I am racist and so are you."

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  2. The Poetry of Race

    In her book "Citizen: An American Lyric," poet Claudia Rankine challenges readers to explore their underlying assumptions about race. She tells Charles Monroe-Kane what compelled her to write the book, and about visiting Ferguson, Missouri.

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  3. Growing Up Black in America

    A few years ago, Wisconsin Public Radio producer Cynthia Woodland sat down with Anthony Cooper and his sons -- 13-year-told Akheem and 14-year-old Anthony Jr. -- to talk about the challenges of being a black teen in America.

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  4. Race and Crime

    At the heart of many Americans' fear of black men is an ugly stereotype -- the stereotype of the black criminal. Historian Khalil Gibran Muhammad traces some of our current attitudes about race and crime to the late 19th century, when sociologists first began looking at crime statistics.

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  5. What Are You Afraid Of?

    Everyone's afraid of something. Here's a small sampling of fears from Question Bridge: Black Males, a transmedia project that fosters dialogue between African American men of diverse backgrounds.

    Question Bridge: Black Males was created by Chris Johnson and Hank WIllis Thomas, with Bayeté Ross Smith and Kamal Sinclair.

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  6. On Our Minds: Policing the Police

    Inspired by stories of police brutality and the Rodney King beating, civil rights attorney Connie Rice says she declared "war" on the LAPD in the 1990s. These days, she trains and supervises 50 officers in one of Los Angeles' toughest communities.

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