Political Engagement

Image: Tabor-Roeder Via: Flickr Creative Commons
October 19, 2014

With the elections approaching, candidates and campaigns are working hard to get out the vote. But what would it take to get people politically involved all year round? This hour we explore a few ways, whether it's by using games to make the political process more fun, or mobilizing activists through the Internet.

  1. Making Democracy Fun

    Correction: This interview refers to a survey finding that only 22% of Americans trust government at all levels. The actual survey was limited to trust in the federal government, and found that 22% of Americans trusted the government in Washington "almost always or most of the time".

    We all know it's important to be involved in local government, but can political participation also be fun? Josh Lerner thinks so. He believes local governments could boost the fun factor in the political process by borrowing a few ideas from game design.

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  2. Voices From The Internet Underground

    All across the world, young activists are mobilizing over the Internet and demanding change. In her new book, "Now I Know Who My Comrades Are," Emily Parker profiles a few of these online activists, and writes about how they're transforming life in China, Cuba and Russia. She spoke with Steve Paulson about how the Internet is helping to create a new generation of politically engaged citizens.

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  3. Against Voting

    In his book "The Ethics of Voting," Georgetown philosopher Jason Brennan argues that we'd be better off if more people stayed home on Election Day. He says citizens don't have a civic duty to vote, and that some of us probably shouldn't vote at all.

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  4. Dangerous Idea: Differential Technological Development

    Nick Bostrom's Dangerous Idea? Societies should limit the development of harmful technologies while promoting beneficial ones.

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  5. On Our Minds: Dataclysm

    In his new book, "Dataclysm," OkCupid co-founder and president Christian Rudder pores through online data to reveal some surprising truths about our society. He told Sara Nics what he discovered about people's dating preferences and race relations by looking at data from Facebook and Google.

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