A Philosophy of Boredom -- Lars Svendsen

August 24, 2014

Lars Svendsen talks with Anne Strainchamps about his book, "A Philosophy of Boredom."

Guest(s): 

Comments

You have said "all of us" a few times in the interview. Am I really the only person who doesn't experience boredom... Ever?? Sometimes I long for it, but I haven't had the opportunity.

As I listened to Lars, and he talked about a boring lecture, I had the insight that during a tedious lecture people get bored because they are being talked AT... They appear to be doing something but their brain is not engaged. So it seems to me that it is that dis-engagement that IS the boredom... As he said; alienation. Same for those who have that depression type boredom: unable to engage with life, others, their surroundings. I know those people and until this moment I couldn't understand how someone can find nothing to engage with, but as an aspect of depression that makes more sense.

No: I don't even get bored in boring lectures. I can always find some tidbit to hook my engagement to, or my mind just spins off from something said, or seen, into thinking of other things.

Like Quinten Crisp, one of my favorite things is to sit, blink and breath. It never seems to get dull.

Perhaps the antidote is to teach children HOW to be engaged with their world, in every situation, if they don't have a natural knack for it.

You have said "all of us" a few times in the interview. Am I really the only person who doesn't experience boredom... Ever?? Sometimes I long for it, but I haven't had the opportunity.

As I listened to Lars, and he talked about a boring lecture, I had the insight that during a tedious lecture people get bored because they are being talked AT... They appear to be doing something but their brain is not engaged. So it seems to me that it is that dis-engagement that IS the boredom... As he said; alienation. Same for those who have that depression type boredom: unable to engage with life, others, their surroundings. I know those people and until this moment I couldn't understand how someone can find nothing to engage with, but as an aspect of depression that makes more sense.

No: I don't even get bored in boring lectures. I can always find some tidbit to hook my engagement to, or my mind just spins off from something said, or seen, into thinking of other things.

Like Quinten Crisp, one of my favorite things is to sit, blink and breath. It never seems to get dull.

Perhaps the antidote is to teach children HOW to be engaged with their world, in every situation, if they don't have a natural knack for it.