In Pain

January 29, 2012

You stub your toe, hit your head on an open cupboard, slam your fingers in a car door, slice your hand on the sharp lip of can, or lick an envelope the wrong way. Your toes throbs, your head aches, your fingers pound, your hand hurts, your lip smarts.

Pain is your body’s way of letting you know that something is wrong. In Pain looks at the human, mystical, scientific, market and funny sides of pain.

  1. Justin O. Schmidt on Grading Stings

    Justin O. Schmidt has been stung by nearly every insect with a stinger, from the benign honeybee to the viscious tarantula hawk wasp. He is a research biologist and professor at the University of Arizona school of Entomology and he told Steve Paulson about his creation, the Schmidt Sting Pain Index.

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  2. Laughing at Pain

    Alan Dale says laughing at slapstick is - at its heart - an expression of our sympathy with TV and film characters who get hurt. He says it's also relief that, for once, it's not us in pain.

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  3. Sacred Pain with Ariel Glucklich

    In many cultures, people use pain as a means of coming closer to God.

    Ariel Glucklich talks with Jim Fleming about the history and psychology behind the practices.

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  4. Pain Wars

    Americans spend billions of dollars a year on over-the-counter pain relievers. In fact, all over the world, easing pain is big business. And Aspirin’s one of the top sellers.  Why? Charles Mann, author of “The Aspirin Wars”, tells Steve Paulson what happened when a German company called Bayer came to America:

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  5. Life in Pain

    For most of us, pain is a sign of physical injury. Generally the pain fades as the injury heals. But for people with Behcet's Syndrom pain is a constant companion.

    Jimmy Palmieri tells Anne Strainchamps about his practice of praying the pain away.

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