Making A Home

August 5, 2017
(was 12.04.2016)

Anyone who’s moved knows how difficult it can be to settle into a new place. Whether it’s another country or an apartment just down the block, it takes time and work to get comfortable. We’re living through a period of mass human migration, with people on the move all over the planet. This hour, we’re talking about home – how to take an unfamiliar place and make it yours.

  1. A Violinist Flees Syria and Discovers a New Home in the US

    Three years ago, violinist Mariela Shaker escaped the Syrian Civil War and relocated to the US, moving from Aleppo, a city of 2 million people, to a small Illinois town of less than 10,000. Here’s how she found home in an unfamiliar place.

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  2. How 'Home' Made Us Human

    The sense of home, of feeling safe and secure, is so essential to our everyday lives. Neuroanthropologist John S. Allen believes there’s a deeper significance to that pull back home. He believes the home is one of the most important inventions in our evolution, one that marked our shift from nest-building apes to humans. Steve Paulson caught up with him to find out why.

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  3. For Some Veterans, the Return Home is the Hardest Part of Their Tour

    For some veterans, coming home from war can often be a struggle. In his book "Tribe," journalist Sebastian Junger offers a nuanced and thought provoking take on why it’s so difficult and complicated for some returning veterans. He believes that it’s not combat that’s the problem. Instead, it’s something that’s missing from our culture: a sense of being part of a tribe.

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  4. Bookmark: Jonathan Chait recommends “What Hath God Wrought” by Daniel Walker Howe

    When and how did American get so polarized? For answers, Jonathan Chait recommends reading "What Hath God Wrought,"  a history of American politics from 1815-1848 by the Pulitzer prize-winning historian Daniel Walker Howe.

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  5. The Revolutionary War’s Impact on America

    Children’s novelist Laurie Halse Anderson has just come out with her long-awaited final volume in her “Seeds of America” trilogy, which follows three young slaves during the American Revolution. In the book, "Ashes," white colonists everywhere can be heard talking about liberty and freedom – just not for African Americans. Laurie traces our nation’s deep history of racial injustice to its origins in 1776.

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