Living Dangerously: Live in Utah

Anne Strainchamps standing at a podium at the Rose Wagner Center
September 11, 2016
(was 11.15.2015)

There are many ways to live dangerously. Sure, you can take part in a death defying feat like skydiving, but living dangerously also sometimes involves taking intellectual risks, opening up, and being honest with yourself. To the Best of Our Knowledge recently travelled to Salt Lake City to speak with a few people, live onstage, about what it means to live dangerously.

  1. Rock Climber Overcomes Loss by Learning How to Fly

    Steph Davis is a renowned rock climber who's considered one of the best in the world. But after the death of her husband, Mario Richard, nearly a decade ago, she discovered a new and potentially more dangerous career -- as a skydiver, BASE jumper and wingsuit flyer.

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  2. Two Activists Challenge the Mormon Church from Inside and Out

    One way to live dangerously is to stand up for your principles, especially if it means challenging those closest to you. Documentary filmmaker Kendall Wilcox and feminist activist Kate Kelly both exposed themselves to enormous risk when they pushed for change within the LDS Church and community.

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  3. Canopy Biologist Studies Movement from Treetops to Prisons

    Nalini Nadkarni has been called “the queen of canopy research,” in part because of her personal philosophy to bring together two groups - the trees and the general public. She does this by collaborating with dancers, rappers, artists, and prisoners, just to name only a few. She created the Big Canopy Database to help researchers around the world to store the rich trove of data she and others are uncovering.

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  4. Finding Joy and Discomfort in the History of the National Parks

    If you had to pick one writer, one poet, who has persistently reminded us of the connection between inner and outer landscapes it would be Terry Tempest Williams. She's advocated again and again for the preservation of wild places and the importance of national wilderness through books like “Refuge,” “Desert Quartet,” “Finding Beauty in a Broken World” and “When Women Were Birds.” She'll soon be releasing a new book -- “The Hour of Land: A Personal Topography of America’s National Parks.”

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