Imagining the Future

March 9, 2014

How much time do you spend thinking about the future? Oh sure, you’ve probably got plans for the weekend or are thinking about how your kids are doing in school.

But how much time to do we spend – as a nation, a global community – thinking about what our lives might look like in 50 or 100 years. 

Are we building the future we want?

  1. Future Living - Mitchell Joachim

    It’s 2055, a regular weekday morning… Where do you wake up? With a booming population and more people moving into urban areas, chances are you’d be living in a city. But what might that city look like? Mitchell Joaquim is an architect, and one of the founders of the innovative design group, TerreForm1.

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  2. Working in the Future

    So your future self’s woken up at home on this weekday in 2055. Time for work, right? But what kind of work? With America’s old industries sagging, what kind of jobs will we do? Here's MIT management professor, Erik Brynjolfsson.

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  3. Eating the Future

    With food insecurity growing around the globe, the unpredictabilities of climate change and population growth booming... what will we eat in the future? Jonathan Foley heads the Global Landscape Initiative at the University of Minnesota’s Institute on the Environment. 

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  4. Sonic Sidebar: Eduardo Galeano

    In all this talk about the future, we should probably remember that the past repeats itself. Here's lauded Latin American author, Eduardo Galeano reading from his “Children of the Days.” 

    You can also listen to our extended conversation with him.

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  5. Dangerous Idea: Loneliness Is a Gift

    Novelist Olivia Laing's Dangerous Idea? Loneliness is a gift.

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  6. On Our Minds: History's Women

    For Women's History Month, we're celebrating one of history's forgotten women, Jane Franklin. Harvard historian Jill Lepore talks about why she chose to write a biography of Ben Franklin's sister.

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