Graphic Art Grows Up

February 26, 2012
(was 01.30.2011)

It used to be that comics were just for kids.   Today, we call them "graphic novels," and they're one of the fastest growing forms of American literature. In this hour of To the Best of Our Knowledge, how graphic art grew up...with Will Eisner's biographer, Jules Feiffer, Dennis Kitchen, and Robert Crumb.

  1. Jules Feiffer on "Backing into Forward"

    Cartoonist Jules Feiffer started on his path to fame in the 1950s with a cartoon strip for "The Village Voice" that eventually won him a Pulitzer Prize.

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  2. Michael Shumacher on "A Dreamer's Life in Comics"

    Not all illustrators agree on what to call graphic novels or when the first one appeared, but most agree that the man who brought them into the mainstream was Will Eisner.

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  3. Denis Kitchen on "Oddly Compelling Art"

    Denis Kitchen founded Kitchen Sink Press in 1969, and he was the publisher who brought Eisner's work to the public.

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  4. Sophie and Robert Crumb on "Evolution of a Crazy Artist"

    Robert Crumb and Sophie Crumb tell Steve Paulson about her development and work.

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