The Fundamentals of Faith

March 9, 2003

The differences among the world’s various religions are getting a lot more ink these days than the similarities.  In this hour of To the Best of Our Knowledge stories of common ground.  “The Life of Pi,” in which an Indian boy finds magic in three different faiths with the help of a Bengal Tiger.  Also, father Abraham - why a dusty figure from the scriptures has the power to unite three of the world’s great religions.

  1. Bruce Feiler on Abraham

    Bruce Feiler is the author of “Abraham: A Journey to the Heart of Three Faiths.”  He tells Jim Fleming that Abraham is a central figure for three great religions - Christianity, Judaism and Islam - but their interpretations of his story are different.

    0
    Your rating: None
    5
    Average: 5 (1 vote)
  2. Father Elias Chacour on Interfaith Schools

    Father Abuna Elias Chacour is a Palestinian, Arab, Christian Israeli. He runs the Mar Elias Interfaith Institution, which teaches students up to 50 years old principles of religious toleration.

    0
    Your rating: None
    3
    Average: 3 (1 vote)
  3. Yann Martel on Novel Of Faith

    Yann Mantel won the Booker Prize for his novel “Life of Pi.” It’s the story of a young Indian boy, Pi, trapped at sea with a Bengal tiger named Richard Parker.  Pi believes in and practices three major religions.

    0
    Your rating: None
    4
    Average: 4 (1 vote)
  4. William Dean on Pop Culture and Faith

    William Dean teaches theology. His book is “The American Spiritual Culture, and the Invention of Jazz, Football, and the Movies.” 

    0
    Your rating: None
    4
    Average: 4 (1 vote)
  5. Shirley Cunningham on Feminine Divine

    Shirley Cunningham is a former nun and the author of “Chasing God.”  She tells Steve Paulson about her spiritual quest for feminine images of the Divine, including the Black Madonna.

    0
    Your rating: None
    3
    Average: 3 (1 vote)