Film Junkies

February 28, 2016

It’s Oscar season and Hollywood is once again celebrating the best films of the year. It would seem that we're a nation obsessed with movies. As a country, we spend billions of dollars to watch them every year, and celebrate them with a variety of awards ceremonies. But what separates a classic from a box office disaster? This hour, we turn to a few of the people who know film best -- the critics who review the latest releases week after week.

  1. A.O. Scott on the Art of Criticism

    In his new book “Better Living Through Criticism,” A.O. Scott distills his decades-long career into a simple to read manifesto that not only explains the qualities of a good critic, but argues their fundamental importance to any culture.

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  2. Manohla Dargis Recommends 'Boyhood'

    NY Times film critic Manohla Dargis selects her favorite film of the year:  Richard Linklater's "Boyhood," filmed over the course of 12 years.

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  3. Roger Ebert on Film Criticism

    Perhaps no other person was a greater advocate for film and film criticism than Roger Ebert. With a career spanning more than 50 years, Ebert was the source America turned to for advice on what to watch week after week. A few years before his death, Roger Ebert sat down with Steve Paulson and reflected on his legendary and prolific career as a film critic.

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  4. Crying at the Movies

    What is it exactly that we love about the movies? For Madelon Sprengnether, going to the movies prompted a journey of self discovery and helped her cope with the sudden death of her father. It all started with a Bengali film called "Pather Panchali."

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  5. When Killers Go Unpunished

    Sometimes a great movie forces you to see the world in a completely different way. That’s the case with Joshua Oppenheimer’s documentary, "The Act of Killing." The film follows a former Indonesian death squad leader as he remembers and even re-enacts the atrocities he committed. 

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  6. Inside Hollywood's Race Problem

    Mike Sargent is a filmmaker and a co-founder of the Black Film Critics Circle. He spoke with Anne Strainchamps about the #OscarSoWhite campaign, and racial diversity in Hollywood.

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