Extinction (Update)

November 27, 2016
(was 10.18.2015)

Our planet is facing a mass extinction crisis. By the end of the century, we could lose up to half of all living species. But people are working hard to save endangered species and habitats, and a few scientists are even trying to bring lost species - like passenger pigeons and woolly mammoths - back to life.

  1. How To Clone a Mammoth - Beth Shapiro

    Could we actually clone a mammoth? Yes and no, says biologist Beth Shapiro--a pioneer in the new science of de-extinction. She takes us behind the scenes to examine the science and ethics of resurrecting extinct species.

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  2. Are You Ready for the Next Mass Extinction?

    Coral reefs and many of the oceans' marvels may disappear before this century ends, according to a new scientific study. Science writer Elizabeth Kolbert says we're facing the sixth great extinction. She tells stories from the front lines of the fight against extinction, from Panama to Australia's Great Barrier Reef.

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  3. Recording America's Rarest Bird

    The story of finding and recording the rarest bird in America: the Ivory-Billed Woodpecker.

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  4. From the Sabertooth to the Grizzly

    Doug Peacock is a legend in wilderness circles. A friend of Edward Abbey, Peacock was a Vietnam vet so traumatized by the war that he escaped into the wilderness once he returned to America. He says grizzlies saved his life.

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  5. Dangerous Idea: Tax Water Use

    As water becomes a scare resource, how about taxing everyone for the water they use? That's Michal Charles Moore's dangerous idea.

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    3
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  6. Writing the American West

    David Gessner discovered the American West as a young man, and the huge mountains and wide open spaces changed his life. He recently took a road trip through the West, following in the footsteps of two literary heroes, Edward Abbey and Wallace Stegner. Gessner says their books help us see the West in all its complexity.

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