Disability and the Arts

May 5, 2002

A car accident at twenty-one left John Callahan paralyzed.  He’s become a very successful cartoonist -- poking fun at disabilities and the idiosyncrasies of life.    His work has been described as “rude, shocking, tasteless, and depraved” – by his fans.  Next time on To the Best of Our Knowledge, we’ll see if he agrees.  Also, life with cerebral palsy from playwright Lyle Victor Albert.

  1. John Callahan on Life as a Cartoonist

    John Callahan is a C5-6 quadriplegic. With only limited arm movement, he’s become a successful cartoonist. Callahan explains why he doesn’t shy away from outrageous cartoons.

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  2. Geneva Handy Southall on Blind Tom

    Geneva Handy Southall tells Jim Fleming about Blind Tom, a nineteenth century American prodigy who could reproduce any sound he heard.

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  3. Lyle Victor Albert on "Scraping the Surface"

    Lyle Victor Albert is a playwright who’s gotten the most attention for his one-man show “Scraping the Surface,” which recounts his experiences with cerebral palsy.

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  4. Martin Norden on Disability in the Movies

    Martin Norden tells Anne Strainchamps that the disabled have been in films from the beginning, but only as stereotypes: bad disabled people get killed off, while good disabled people get cured.

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