Death

November 23, 2003

A Swedish environmentalist believes we really should give back to the earth, even after we’ve died.  Her company is trying to replace cremation with a technologically-enhanced form of organic composting, and she’s already got the support of King Carl Gustav and the Church of Sweden.  In this hour of To the Best of Our Knowledge, giving life after death.  Also, we’ll explore the curious lives of human cadavers with author Mary Roach.  And Lisa Lieberman on the history of suicide.

  1. Mary Roach on "The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers"

    Mary Roach is the author of “Stiff: The Curious Lives of Human Cadavers.” She reads from the book and talks about observing an anatomy class.

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  2. Dr. Bill Bass on "Death's Acre"

    Dr. Bill Bass is a forensic anthropologist and founder of The Body Farm at the University of Tennessee. It’s the one place in the world devoted to the study of human decomposition.

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  3. Lisa Lieberman on "The Cultural Meaning of Suicide"

    Lisa Lieberman is the author of “Leaving You: The Cultural Meaning of Suicide.”   She talks about the suicide of her grandfather and the extravagant narratives left by 19th century suicides.

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  4. Eric Idle on Death and Humor

    Eric Idle is a former member of the Monty Python comedy group and is now touring solo across America. When his tour stopped in Madison, he talked about death and comedy with Doug Gordon.

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  5. Jonathan Carroll on "White Apples"

    Novelist Jonathan Carroll talks about his book “White Apples.” It’s the story of a man who finds out he’s already dead, and the afterlife is right here.

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